Objective 1.2

HIGHLIGHTS 

  • Launch of the Arab Humanitarian Portal—the first Arabic website dedicated to humanitarian action.
     
  • No reports of non-compliance with the agreed principles and guidelines for humanitarian operations in areas with international military presence during 2012.
     
  • Establishment of a dedicated Private Sector Section within the Partnerships and Resource Mobilization Branch to ensure organizational coherence and focus.

YEAR IN REVIEW

In 2012, OCHA strengthened relationships with a wider group of operational partners and broadened its partnership with new stakeholders, tapping into all resources and diverse expertise and capacity.

OCHA improved strategic coherence among humanitarian, development, peacebuilding, and peace and security efforts, as appropriate. As a member of the the inter-agency and inter-departmental Integrated Mission Planning Process (IMPP) Working Group, OCHA worked with UN humanitarian agencies and NGOs to ensure the reflection of humanitarian concerns in the revision of the IMPP guidance package. OCHA helped to organize and lead IMPP workshops and training programmes to increase understanding of integration policy and practice, and to ensure understanding of how humanitarian issues should be appropriately included in integrated strategies and planning processes. OCHA significantly improved its participation in integrated coordination mechanisms at headquarters through more systematic engagement in Integrated (Mission) Task Forces at the working and Director levels. This included participation in field-level integrated planning processes, including the Somalia Strategic Review and support to UN planning for regional operations in Mali.

OCHA issued contextual guidance on the use of foreign Military and Civil Defence Assets to support emerging humanitarian operations, meaning that Member States and partners were better informed to offer foreign-military support to humanitarian crises. This resulted in no known instances of non-compliance with the agreed principles and guidelines for humanitarian operations in areas with an international military presence during 2012.

The ArabHum online portal was launched at the Humanitarian Information Sharing and Partnership conference, which OCHA organized in September 2012 in Kuwait. The portal is the first Arabic website dedicated to humanitarian action. It addresses the shortage of timely information on global crises in Arabic by ensuring that analysis and reporting in Arabic are readily available in one place, i.e. ArabHum, to inform policy and funding decisions. Sharing this information also strengthens the development of common positions and understanding of emerging humanitarian issues. Regular ArabHum board meetings have seen participation at the executive level from across the Gulf, in a further sign of the robust relationships built by OCHA.

OCHA increased engagement with NGOs and charitable organizations outside the IASC system, particularly with capacity-building efforts for NGOs in the Gulf region. Outreach to non-IASC NGOs has been supported by HQ-led initiatives, with a particular focus on familiarizing Gulf-based and Turkish NGOs with humanitarian coordination structures. In December 2012, OCHA and The Humanitarian Forum organized a regional Middle East and North Africa workshop for humanitarian actors. It focused on identifying priority trends and issues, and promoting operational collaboration and trust-building between regional humanitarian actors and the international system. At the same time, OCHA staff went to the Turkish-Syrian border to reach out to Turkish and Islamic NGOs involved in the Syria crisis, to help link them to the wider humanitarian effort through trainings, and by encouraging them to participate in humanitarian coordination forums.

To address the need for organizational coherence and focus in OCHA’s private-sector outreach, OCHA established a dedicated Private Sector Section and developed a concept for OCHA’s private-sector engagement. OCHA and Deloitte established a partnership focused on improving humanitarian leadership, and plan to expand the same into a multi-year, multi-activity relationship (see box on Deloitte partnership). The related Humanitarian Leadership Summit and follow-up coaching sessions for Humanitarian Coordinators have been deemed a success by all stakeholders. OCHA has also secured pro-bono support from Vantage Partners to enhance in-house capacity for partnership-building with the private sector and to complete a review of OCHA's current private-sector partnerships. OCHA’s collaboration with the World Economic Forum and relations with the Global Compact Office have also deepened, and the new section is providing systematic support to regional and country offices.

Progress against Performance Framework
RESULT 1 Greater coherence between humanitarian, peace and security, and development action.
INDICATORS
1. OCHA effectively contributes to integrated strategic-planning processes, and represents humanitarian interests and concerns to DPA and DPKO.
BASELINE

In 2011, OCHA was heavily engaged in several mission-planning processes, including for Libya and the Republic of South Sudan. However, OCHA’s participation in field-level integrated coordination mechanisms is not uniform. Moreover, there is still strong scepticism from parts of the non-UN humanitarian community towards the principles of integration. This is partly due to a lack of clarity on the scope of integration arrangements available and misperceptions of their impact on humanitarian activities.

TARGET 2012

a) Increased engagement by non-UN humanitarian actors in integration discussions and forums, including the Integration Steering Group. 

 

b) Decisions related to integrated mission planning reflect humanitarian positions and concerns.

PROGRESS REPORT 2012

a) OCHA supported the launch of the study commissioned by the Integration Steering Group (ISG) on integration and humanitarian space at events in multiple countries from December 2011 to March 2012. The ISG endorsed several recommendations in the study, and relevant elements are being incorporated in the review of the IMPP package. The revision of the IMPP guidance was not finalized by the end of 2012, but as planned it will be put to the ISG for endorsement in February 2013. While NGO representatives have not been invited to participate in all ISG meetings, they have participated inrelevant agenda items. 

 

b) The SG’s endorsement of a phased and context-based approach to structural integration in Somalia reflects humanitarian positions and concerns, but it remains to be seen whether the Security Council will accept the SG’s recommendation, or whether it will impose structural integration. 

 
In addition:
The IASC paper on UN integration and humanitarian space was not endorsed in 2012, but will be in 2013. OCHA has worked with UN humanitarian agencies and NGOs to ensure that its main provisions are incorporated into the IMPP revision and individual advocacy efforts.
TARGET 2013

a) Humanitarian actors’ increased support for in-country integration arrangements being proposed.

 

b) Integration-planning guidance includes provisions to protect humanitarian space. 

2. A more coherent and consistent approach by the humanitarian community in its interaction with military forces and the use of MCDA.
BASELINE

The approach to civil-military coordination by IASC humanitarian organizations suffers from a lack of consistency and coherence. This failure is against a background of international missions and Governments deploying military forces in complex emergencies to support humanitarian operations, but often with an underlying political and strategic aim. Operational partners and other actors need to receive better knowledge and understanding of the UN humanitarian civil-military coordination concept, principles and functions, and be persuaded to interact more effectively with military forces.

TARGET 2012

a) Humanitarian organizations’ increased compliance with agreed principles and guidelines for humanitarian operations in areas with international military presence.

 

b) An IASC WG focus on coherent and consistent civil-military interaction at the cluster level.

PROGRESS REPORT 2012

a) By issuing contextual guidance on the use of foreign MCDA to support emerging humanitarian operations, Member States and partners are better informed to offer support. This has resulted in no known instances of non-compliance with the agreed principles and guidelines for humanitarian operations in areas with an international military presence. 

 

b) Under the auspices of the IASC Task Force on Humanitarian Space and Civil-Military Relations, the development of a think piece on Civil-Military Relations has led to the identification and agreement to develop cross-cluster guidance on civil-military interaction at the cluster level.

TARGET 2013

a) Humanitarian organizations’ full compliance with agreed principles and guidelines during humanitarian operations in areas with international military presence. 

 

b) IASC TF aligned to address broader policy discussions on civil-military issues.

 

c) Agreed IASC position on civil-military interaction by clusters. Field reports/HQ sit reps, no report of breaches.

RESULT 2 Multilateral humanitarian response benefits from the contributions of a wider group of operational partners, civil society and the private sector.
INDICATORS
1. Enhanced OCHA institutional relationships with NGOs that are currently outside the IASC.
BASELINE

OCHA engages with NGOs at headquarters and field levels, particularly those associated with the IASC. However, there are significant gaps in relationship-building. At the same time, there are increasing opportunities for partnerships with emerging NGO and civil-society partners, particularly Islamic and Arab NGOs.

TARGET 2012

a) Capacity-building activities for NGOs are organized, including in the Gulf Cooperation Council countries and with Government departments.

 

b) Engagement of non-IASC NGOs in multilateral coordinated humanitarian action in at least three major emergencies.

 

c) Gulf-based NGOs engage in OCHA-organized events and contribute to a dedicated website for information sharing in Arabic.

PROGRESS REPORT 2012

a) OCHA led or facilitated trainings on humanitarian financing tools and services, SPHERE, international humanitarian systems, and humanitarian response targeting local and regional NGOs as well as various Governments in the region. 

 

b) In the Syria crisis, OCHA reached out to NGOs, especially Turkish and Islamic NGOs working at the Turkish-Syrian border, to facilitate their network-building with humanitarian actors. These activities were supported by contacts with these NGOs from HQ to strengthen the relationship and encourage participation in the multilateral system. 

 

c) In December 2012, OCHA and the Humanitarian Forum organized a regional Middle East and North Africa workshop for humanitarian actors. It focused on identifying priority trends and issues, promoting operational collaboration and trust-building between regional humanitarian actors and the international system.

TARGET 2013

a) Capacity-building activities are organized for NGOs outside the IASC.

 

b) Engagement of non-IASC NGOs in multilateral coordinated humanitarian action in at least six major emergencies.

 

c) A 30 per cent increase from the 2012 baseline of Gulf-based NGOs engaging in OCHA-organized events and contributing to a dedicated website for information sharing in Arabic.

2. Increased private-sector operational and financial support for humanitarian action.
BASELINE 2011

OCHA has 32 agreements with private-sector organizations. They include four binding agreements providing pro-bono goods and services, and 28 non-binding agreements committing to increased cooperation. During 2011, three new partnership agreements were signed. OCHA also disseminated guidance to the private sector on how to provide assistance during major emergencies; activated operational support mechanisms from all existing private-sector partners; and launched a public-service announcement for the Horn of Africa crisis. Private-sector pledges and contributions to CERF in 2011 totalled US$263,781.

TARGET 2012

a) Expansion of two partnership agreements in logistics, information management and telecommunications.

 

b) A 5 per cent increase in CERF contributions over the average of the previous years (2006-2011). Two new major private-sector donors ($10,000 and above) to CERF.

PROGRESS REPORT 2012

a) Due to the re-orientation of OCHA’s private-sector engagement and the establishment of a dedicated Private Sector Section, OCHA did not pursue additional partnership agreements in logistics. A partnership with Deloitte was brokered, which OCHA aims to deepen into a multi-year, multi-activity relationship. The related Humanitarian Leadership Summit and follow-up coaching sessions for Humanitarian Coordinators were deemed a success by all stakeholders.

 

b) CERF did not meet this specific 2012 target. While its 2012 contribution levels were the fourth largest in its history ($425 million), private-sector donations reduced by approximately 19 per cent compared with 2011. No new private-sector partners were recorded in 2012. 

TARGET 2013

a) Expansion of two partnership agreements in logistics, information management and telecommunications.

 

b) A 5 per cent increase in contributions to CERF over the average of previous years (2006-2012, except for 2010). Two new major private-sector donors ($10,000 and above) to CERF.